We have recently updated this site to improve security. As a result you may need to reset your password next time you log in. Simply click the Reset Password link and follow the instructions. Sorry for any inconvenience.

Show us your chicken housings

SteelSteel Member
edited April 2011 in "Off Your Chest"
Being sort of new to chicken keeping (only had a year so defo still a newbie compared to some of you guys) I made do with whatever housing I could in the beginning. Now I'm getting more into chickens, I getting more interested in different types of housings and different set ups eg pens, runs etc.

Any chance I could be nosy and ask you guys and gals to do a bit of a show and tell? What works about the set up you've got and what doesn't?

Thought this could be an interesting thread to keep going, especially for new chicken keepers....

Comments

  • mandiemandie Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    i keep and breed pekins and find the arc style suits them:D
  • edited May 2009
    Steel wrote:
    Being sort of new to chicken keeping (only had a year so defo still a newbie compared to some of you guys) I made do with whatever housing I could in the beginning. Now I'm getting more into chickens, I getting more interested in different types of housings and different set ups eg pens, runs etc.

    Any chance I could be nosy and ask you guys and gals to do a bit of a show and tell? What works about the set up you've got and what doesn't?

    Thought this could be an interesting thread to keep going, especially for new chicken keepers....

    hi,

    I have a converted shed that works fine with me, its basically a big shed with 2 small windows high on either side and a door at the front, we then got a carpenter to cut out a chicken door, put up some perches and make a ramp. its pretty big so it could easily fit 35 chickens in is! its just easy and convenient, you just open up the the normal door for the ones still on the perches to fly down and the chicken door for the ones that have already jumped down :D
  • SteelSteel Member
    edited May 2009
    I have an ark as well for my three, with a custom made large 'extension' on the side that was supposed to be the nest boxes but is now their bedroom. They all squeeze in there and the eggs get laid on the floor on the other side of the coop :rolleyes: It's ok, but I'd rather they had a large permanent enclosure with house inside. I'm just lazy, I hate having to carry the ark round the garden with hubby and replace the skirt of roofing tiles all round it. There's always an ants nest under at least one tile.

    I keep nosing over garden fences to see how people set theirs up and getting hubby to skid to a halt in the car if i spot a glimpse of one. I did see one once that looked like it was made from a very large dog kennel, some 7 feet high, about 15 feet long and about 10 feet wide with a nice shed set up for them at the end.

    Now I have chicken palace envy....:D
  • daisychuckdaisychuck Junior Member
    edited May 2009
    my husband is a joiner, and after scouring ebay for hours, he decided that he would make one himself.:D It took him the best part of a weekend to make it, referring to websites for pictures etc. The house itself is about 3 foot square with a large door on one side for cleaning purposes, and a smaller one for the hens to use. The house then stands inside a very large run - most of the ones pictured on ebay are only a bit taller than the hen house. Ours stands 6 foot high, and whilst the hens don't particularly need the height :D it's so easy for us to get inside the run and clean it, feed the hens and sometimes just sit on a stool and watch:) The run measures 9 feet by 6 feet and we have four hens. (We both work - I'm a nurse and my husband is self employed and although we would love them to free range all day, I don't want anything bad to happen whilst we're out - so the run is a good size) Because the run is close to the hen house, the ramp for the hens was too steep, so we made a platform for them to step onto first, then the ramp is attached at 90 degrees to this. They love to snuggle up together on the platform during the day and have a little snooze;). The nest box is attached to the house, but it is accessible from outside the run, so that we don't have to go inside to collect the eggs - although they haven't laid any yet. My advice would be to consult ebay, or other sites, for pictures of what you would like, then contact a local joiner, show him/her the pictures and have one made. You may end up spending a little bit more but you'll get a much better hen house that will last much longer than a cheaply made one . I'd love to post a picture but I'm not sure how to do this.
  • SalzSalz Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    I looked and read up at loads of sites for hen houses and was stunned at how expensive they were and how ugly. I only have a smallish garden and I wanted something nice to look at as well as being functional so I built my own.
    It took me a week and cost about £150. Its 4ft by 4ft with a large door at the back for easy cleaning, a small door at the front for the girls. I also gave it some small wire covered windows for extra ventilation, with little shutters for cold weather and a 2 compartment nest box. This all sits on 4, 2ft high brick piers to prevent rats and to give some shelter in horrid weather.
    This is all in a 10ft by 22ft run, with 6ft high chicken wire that is dug in to the ground for about a foot to prevent Mr Foxy. Although they churned up the run so quickly that I let them free range in the rest of the garden ( they are wrecking my raised veggie beds! ....more fencing needs to be done) but I keep them penned if I have to go out.
    I have six girls, a light sussex, a bluebell, a warren,a speckledy 2 blackrocks and a Welsummer cockerel.
  • SalzSalz Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/salzz/
    Here's a link to my flickr site if you wanna see pictures of the Chicken house and my girls. I hope it works as Ive only just learnt how to copy and paste.:)
  • from field to forkfrom field to fork Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    Fantastic photos Salz.

    I starrted with an old pigeon loft [a big shed really 40 foot by 10 foot square]. A friend had it at the bottom of the garden so I dismantled it and re-erected on a concrete slab back home. Divided it up into three large sections, one for meat birds, one for layers and the other for storage and workshop.

    Then I built my own like Salz's above [but no where so proffessional looking]. I like haveing pitched roofs because it looks less like traditional hen housing. i build the same sort of housing [except bigger] for my pigs because I do not like the look of a traditional pig ark.

    Went to the same trouble for my ducks but that was a waste of time as they have never used it - prefer the long vegetation around their pond.

    I then built a hatchery and brooder under the extended eaves of a barn. This is good for my quail as well as bringing on the day old chooks and ducks.
  • jackiebjackieb Junior Member
    edited June 2009
    Here's mine, completed the extension on the run yesterday.

    Had our girls two weeks today and they've settled in nicely to their new home.

    Jackie
  • Paweł DucPaweł Duc Junior Member
    edited April 2011
    The size of your chicken coop will depend in your experience of raising chickens. Definitely, the more chickens you raise, the larger and wider the spaces you'll need. One thing that you should keep in mind is that, even if you only begin with a few chickens, you'll have to construct a pen bigger than what you originally desire, because chickens can escalate quickly.

    The portable or small chicken pen is a three-sided house. If you want to train your child to raise chickens, this is the best tool to help them practice growing chicks. Note that this is not a healthy living environment for two or three fully grown chickens.

    The mid-sized coop is a bit friendlier environment for four to five chickens. This, most of the time includes a small separate nesting area as well as an egg dish. You'll surely boost up your egg generation with the creation of a well-ventilated and relatively large box-type pen like this one.

    For experienced chicken raisers, the chicken coop designs that they go for is the premium coop. This design will guarantee maximum egg yields, since the pen includes all the necessities to raise chicken for years. The premium coop is a huge and wide hen house that is sufficiently ventilated, which allow chickens to spread their wings and grow their nests.
  • Paweł DucPaweł Duc Junior Member
    edited April 2011
    The size of your chicken coop will depend in your experience of raising chickens. Definitely, the more chickens you raise, the larger and wider the spaces you'll need. One thing that you should keep in mind is that, even if you only begin with a few chickens, you'll have to construct a pen bigger than what you originally desire, because chickens can escalate quickly.

    The portable or small chicken pen is a three-sided house. If you want to train your child to raise chickens, this is the best tool to help them practice growing chicks. Note that this is not a healthy living environment for two or three fully grown chickens.

    The mid-sized coop is a bit friendlier environment for four to five chickens. This, most of the time includes a small separate nesting area as well as an egg dish. You'll surely boost up your egg generation with the creation of a well-ventilated and relatively large box-type pen like this one.

    For experienced chicken raisers, the chicken coop designs that they go for is the premium coop. This design will guarantee maximum egg yields, since the pen includes all the necessities to raise chicken for years. The premium coop is a huge and wide hen house that is sufficiently ventilated, which allow chickens to spread their wings and grow their nests.
  • Paweł DucPaweł Duc Junior Member
    edited April 2011
    The size of your chicken coop will depend in your experience of raising chickens. Definitely, the more chickens you raise, the larger and wider the spaces you'll need. One thing that you should keep in mind is that, even if you only begin with a few chickens, you'll have to construct a pen bigger than what you originally desire, because chickens can escalate quickly.

    The portable or small chicken pen is a three-sided house. If you want to train your child to raise chickens, this is the best tool to help them practice growing chicks. Note that this is not a healthy living environment for two or three fully grown chickens.

    The mid-sized coop is a bit friendlier environment for four to five chickens. This, most of the time includes a small separate nesting area as well as an egg dish. You'll surely boost up your egg generation with the creation of a well-ventilated and relatively large box-type pen like this one.

    For experienced chicken raisers, the chicken coop designs that they go for is the premium coop. This design will guarantee maximum egg yields, since the pen includes all the necessities to raise chicken for years. The premium coop is a huge and wide hen house that is sufficiently ventilated, which allow chickens to spread their wings and grow their nests.
    ____________
    carpenter vancouver
Sign In or Register to comment.