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Producing eggs for sale in local shop

Helen THelen T Junior Member
edited December 2008 in Producers and Vets
I have been selling eggs over the garden fence to friends for a while and have been asked to think about becoming registered in order to supply the local shop (this will involve getting more hens and being a bit more serious about it all so I'm not sure I want to...) anyway, I have looked at the DEFRA site and taken in the rules for registration/packing stations etc. I know that I'd need to weigh them etc to size and pack them; that I'd have to stop putting them in the fridge and have them in a storage "place" of some kind. But can someone tell me what I am looking for when candling eggs given that I'm not about to hatch them? I understand candling to observe the progress of a growing chick, but what would I be candling for given that they'd all be sold for consumption within a couple of days of being laid??

It all seems rather a faff given that I would only have about 20 hens........I'm not about to take over the world or anything.
Advice please
Helen

Comments

  • sharon mcsharon mc Senior Member
    edited August 2008
    I guess you would be candling for the speck of fertility? It does seem odd; would a tiny speck show? Eggs are generally candled at 10+ days to spot an embryo developing, as you say but that normally requires a hen to have actually been sitting on it and to be producing prolactin, I thought (could be wrong, obviously). Also, if there is no cockeral, surely there would be no speck of fertility??? I know that some people do not like to see ANY speck in their eggs (a lot of people who don't eat eggs cite this reason, in my experience) which is probably why DEFRA is requesting this. It does seem odd but then the beaurocracy and rules goverened by DEFRA are legendary.
  • Helen THelen T Junior Member
    edited August 2008
    Just to confirm, I don't have a cockerel, just hens
  • sharon mcsharon mc Senior Member
    edited August 2008
    With no male, there's even less of a reason to be candling for specks, I'd have thought but as I say, that's DEFRA for you!
  • ChrisKChrisK Senior Member
    edited September 2008
    I think you need to candle to make sure there are no cracks or holes in the shell - apparently not all cracks are obvious! I have 35 laying hens plus 4 bantams and cannot get registered because i haven't got enough chooks :confused: - also all the chooks have to be vaccinated against salmonella and they have to come out and inspect your set up, so please let me know how you get on. I am registered with DEFRA as a chicken keeper but that is not the same as being registered as an egg producer - so I've been told by DEFRA. I can sell at the door but I'm not allowed to stamp my eggs, sort them into size or colour and must put a use by date of 21 days on the boxes, oh, and I'm not allowed to advertise them as free range - even though they free range over 2 acres all day.:rolleyes:
  • edited September 2008
    sharon mc wrote:
    I guess you would be candling for the speck of fertility? It does seem odd; would a tiny speck show? Eggs are generally candled at 10+ days to spot an embryo developing, as you say but that normally requires a hen to have actually been sitting on it and to be producing prolactin, I thought (could be wrong, obviously). Also, if there is no cockeral, surely there would be no speck of fertility??? I know that some people do not like to see ANY speck in their eggs (a lot of people who don't eat eggs cite this reason, in my experience) which is probably why DEFRA is requesting this. It does seem odd but then the beaurocracy and rules goverened by DEFRA are legendary.

    You will be candling for blood spots, meat spots and any damage to the outer shell as mentioned above. Blood / meat spots will show up as a small dark patch / stripe and it will take a bit of practice to spot them quickly. It's like a small splash of blood stuck to the yolk. Hairline cracks can let bacteria in so these need to be spotted. Hope this helps - Tim.
  • edited November 2008
    please get lost
  • skoobyskooby Junior Member
    edited December 2008
    also all the chooks have to be vaccinated against salmonella

    As far as i am aware vaccination for salmonella is not legally required.:)
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