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Vets

tarkatarka Member
edited August 2009 in Producers and Vets
Is it just me or do you feel " VETS " charge 4 times more than they should ?

Comments

  • NolaNola Junior Member
    edited March 2008
    I agree..........unless my son becomes one. :) joking.
  • BeckyshensBeckyshens Junior Member
    edited March 2008
    yes i had to pay £40 to have one of my hens put to sleep and be disposed of!
  • sunnysidevalsunnysideval Junior Member
    edited April 2008
    No I don't think it's a lot. Vets have many years of higher level study to get qualified. If a vet is off sick the practice has to get a locum in costing £1000 a day. That's just one of the huge costs (I'm not a vet but none of those I know are making big bucks).

    This week I paid £46 for 10 mins dentistry (NHS) and last month I paid £76 for a minor dishwasher repair. All professional services are expensive.

    ..and Becky, there is an alternative to having your vet put your bird 'to sleep', saving you £40 and the chicken the stress!!
  • tarkatarka Member
    edited April 2008
    Interesting reading your post Sunny , as the 2 vets i know earn mega cash and are bying new properties to expan their buisness , plus drive flashy cars and own 2 and 3 houses each .

    How can a vet charge £380 for a casteration on a little Italian Greyhound :eek:
    £70 for a blood test ?
    £40 to put a bird to sleep isn't cheap either for those that can't or don't have the confidence .

    £5.65 for one drontol plus is ridiculous considering you can buy them from the internet for £1.55 .
    It costs £25 just to walk in to my local vets .
  • tillytilly Member
    edited July 2008
    Hi i strongly agree with you, my vet would not see my chickens and i phoned lots more too. They would look at her when she was dead to cut her open etc. what :mad: good would that do for me and the rest of my birds?
    When i finally found a vet 200 miles away they wanted £25.00 consultation fee £45.00 to send her poo away and still had not even see one chicken yet.
    I was lucky a farmer friend put mine to sleep but there is no way i could aford this amount of money, yes i know i should of thought of that before i had the birds but i mean £70.00 for all that and no one even looked at a bird yet.
  • Happy HennieHappy Hennie Member
    edited September 2008
    Visiting this site has replaced my going to the vets - thanks to all the well informed and helpful members :) ...... except for efgh118. I've got ex-batts and a few months ago a vets bill took me by surprise! :eek: Have since managed to purchase medicines online at a fraction of the cost.
  • sunnysunny Member
    edited January 2009
    If I get a professional service, from a well trained, experienced, vet who has the honesty to admit when (s)he doesn't know what is wrong with a creature I am happy to pay the going rate for the service, provided I can afford it, and the price, or probable price, has been explained to me in advance. It also helps if the vet is polite, gentle with the creature and understanding of the owner's fears and attachment to their animal. There are good and bad vets and some inbetween, just lacking in experience, as in all walks of life.

    I was told by a vet that my hen was in a bad way and not much they could do for it at the beginning of December, this vet admitted that they only had about 1 hen a year in and that they didn't know much about them, so they referred me to a 'poultry expert'. Said 'expert' did not have the facilities to perform a simple drainage procedure (which at the time seemed to be the next step) and who advised me, over the 'phone, that my hen would be too distressed to make the short journey by car to their surgery, (less than 7 miles) and that I should dispatch it myself - without even seeing it.

    Thanks to advice from this site (esp from Crazychick) I ensured the original vet gave my hen Baytril (he didn't think it would do much good in this case - wrong!) and dosed her myself with aspirin at the dose per kilo Laura advised. The difference in the hen was amazing and she is now a much happier, healthier hen, well on the way to recovery.

    However I have met other vets, in a different town, who were brilliant and on one occasion even gave a free flu jab to our kitten while he was on a home visit for a larger animal. So my best advice is to ask around and see which of your animal keeping friends is happy with their vet and which ones you may wish to avoid, preferably before you need one and of course always visit this site and the poultry health & welfare forum! :)
  • sueonmullsueonmull Member
    edited January 2009
    I hope you write to the vets and let them know how you treated your chicken and the outcome, perhaps it will help someone else in the future.
    I don't expect vets to know everything, they have so little training when it comes to animals where traditionally economics dictate their fate.
    What does frustrate me is those vets that are unwilling to listen (and learn) from enthusiastic amateurs self taught through years of experience. It is the same with many of the smaller companion animals.
  • from field to forkfrom field to fork Senior Member
    edited March 2009
    I wonder whether there is a difference between the prices that farm vets charge and the prices that domestic pets vets charge!

    It seems that whenever we jump in our car and take one of the cats to our local [6 miles away] vet they charge £80 or so for a 5 minute consultation plus some meds.

    But when I get our "farm vet" to drive 40 miles to me [Oxfordshire] to look at one of my Dexter cattle it must take her/him an hour to get here, she/he spends an hour here and an hour to get back - all this for ...... you guessed it - aout £80. Not only that but they will stop and have a chat about the pigs or the poultry - giving a bit of advice here and there - real added value!
  • rainbowfishrainbowfish Member
    edited April 2009
    sunny wrote:
    If I get a professional service, from a well trained, experienced, vet who has the honesty to admit when (s)he doesn't know what is wrong with a creature I am happy to pay the going rate for the service, provided I can afford it, and the price, or probable price, has been explained to me in advance.

    Totally agree, I think the 'price being explained and IN ADVANCE is where my faith in vets has fallen, esp having just been stung for a big bill for one of my girls. Her 'stay' certainly seemed to be stretched out with nothing been done on some days except her being 'watched' and me having to phone the vet all the time for updates! No sense of urgency in the treatment whatsoever and we have done a fair bit of to-ing and fro-ing which hasn't been good for either of us when this particular vet is an hour's drive away!:mad:
  • chirpychickchirpychick Junior Member
    edited April 2009
    I agree my horse vets charge less than my small animal vets, my horse vet spends ages on the yard and will also ask after the other animals and take an interest in my chooks , the small animal vets can (not always) insult your intelligence and sell you stuff you don't need...
  • chucksawaychucksaway Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    It would seem that vets can charge what they like as I'm assuming there is no 'governing' body that monitors their charges. I have kept animals of all sorts all my life back in the UK and moved around the country over the years - vets are a matter of shopping around for one that suits you and your pocket best. It has become quite a lottery and I think that a lot of them will over charge if they feel they can get away with it without question. The fact that they have a long training is of no consequence as far as I'm concerned, or that they work long and often unsociable hours in bad weather conditions - they chose the career! It's like so many things today, good vets are good vets and are fair, the others have just become greedy and take us clients for fools.
  • Linz2882Linz2882 Junior Member
    edited May 2009
    Yet again,some small-minded person tarring all vets with one brush. I am a veterinary nurse and I work for 2 friends who have spent the last 3 years struggling to build up a small family run practice in herts. One of them lives in a semi in Luton and the other in a mobile home! I'd like to make a few points:

    1. Vets are the equivalent of private healthcare. If you had to pay for your appendectomy instead of getting it on the NHS, you'd realise how expensive it is. You think £30 is a lot to walk through the door? Try going to BUPA and see how far it gets you!
    2. Farm/equine vets can usually charge less because they work from home/out of thier car and don't have expensive premises to run. They also buy their drugs in much larger amounts so get a better deal.
    3. You can buy drugs cheaper off the internet than most vets can get them from thier suppliers. We are NOT ALLOWED to do this and are restricted to 3 or 4 veterinary suppliers who have the market sown up.
    4. Vet school is expensive. Most vets come out with at least £30k worth of debt.
    5. Vets are obliged to provide 24hr care. If you are running a one man practice that means you don't get a single hour off EVER!
    6. Being a vet/nurse is not like working in an office, you take your work home with you (I'm currently hand rearing a rabbit, the other nurse has a pregnant cat at home and the vet is observing a tortoise for the weekend).
    7. We get charged for disposing of your dead animals (quite a lot actually).
    8. Veterinary surgeries are really expensive to run. Staffing costs are high, rent in the home counties is extortionate and to get decent lab/xray/scanning equipment you either have to spend at least £200k or a fortune renting it.
    9. All vets are different. We currently charge £12.50 for a small animal cons., £16-£18 for a rabbit/reptile/chuck and £26.50 for a cat/dog. Our nearest competitor charges nearly double this. PHONE AROUND!
    10. If, after all this and 20 years of work, your vet can afford a nice house and a flash car, good on him! He deserves it. If you want the same, get yourself to vet school and work YOUR ass off!

    Please don't bad mouth those of us who work really hard, all hours of the day and night, for the love of it. If vets were human surgeons they would earn 3 times as much. Also, google suicide rates for vets, you will see it's amongst the highest in all proffessions. If you don't like your vet, find a new one.
  • blondeblonde Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    Some times you just have to bite the bullet so to speak and if a vet has to intervene then this is better than losing all your chooks. Yes the people who choose to become a vet do so, but they do a good job and yes they can charge but I believe it is better to use one than not to use one and have your animals, whether birds or other suffer because we are all insufficient in our information with in the animal internally. We are all insufficient in the types of antibiotics that we can use and the access to antibiotics is also limited with out a vet. Basically they are not available. So a vet is a very necessary part of life for the animal......I guess you all go to the doctor when you are sick......yes!!!
  • Linz2882Linz2882 Junior Member
    edited May 2009
    By the way, vets do have a 'governing body', it's the RCVS. Everything vets do is carefully monitored. For instance, prescription charges have recently been heavily debated by them and guidelines set. They also deal with complaints and decide on suitable action. Vets, like doctors can be suspended or struck off.
  • chucksawaychucksaway Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    Well I'm sorry to persist here but I have had more years than I care to mention that have involved using vets - I used to run a livery yard and used several different horse vets according to which owners preferred - I have always had several rescue dogs about the place (still have three here in France in fact) - kept milking goats, hens, sheep and a variety of childrens' pets as in rabbits, guinea pigs and a rescued parrot too...... I moved around the UK as and when my husband moved with his job and of course all the animals came too and it was always the first job on the list to find a good local vet. Like it or not NOT ALL VETS ARE GOOD! You can say what you like but some over charge and some are down right rude and unhelpful and even dodge coming out to see an animal if it happens to be inconvenient. I have experienced the good and the bad and on the few occasions I actually read the riot act because I was faced with no other choice, I was treated to some fairly arrogant responses, fobbed off, with claptrap excuses and treated to very rude treatment from the nurses also! When I asked to be allowed to take my complaint to some higher authority..... suddenly it was a different tune! I am full of praise for the majority of vets I have had in the past, the work they do etc., but please don't be naive enough to tell us that ALL vets are their staff are angels because life just isn't like that!
  • chucksawaychucksaway Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    And by the way Linz2882, I am not in the least small-minded, am entitled to my opinion based on my experience and also I actually do work my 'ass' off also but when I provide a service to the public I don't rip them off or be rude to them no matter how many years I've spent qualifying, how long my hours are and how poor or wealthy I may or may not be! I am sure your veterinary friends are tops and bully for you - other people on here have not been so fortunate but that does not mean they are wrong and I don't believe the threads were generally tarring ALL vets with the same brush either! Grow up dear.
  • Linz2882Linz2882 Junior Member
    edited May 2009
    Chucksaway, where in my post did I say either "ALL VETS ARE GOOD" or "all vets and thier staff are angels"? I'm happy for you to disagree with me but please don't misquote me and then use this as a basis for calling me naive! I can't see anything childish about my well-thought out post but I don't mind if you want to challenge any of my points. If you want to question anything I say, please quote me directly! The original post I was answering stated 'VETS' charge too much. Not some vets or even most vets, just 'VETS'. Do you not think it's small-minded to generalise? I don't think all vets are great. I had a lady on the phone in tears last week as another vet had quoted her £200 to treat her cats cystitis! I was disgusted and encouraged her to make a complaint. If more people did this instead of just moaning on forums, the bad apples would be rooted out. I don't like people resenting those who do well for themselves or just because they drive a flash car as I think it's unfair. The whole point of running any small business is to make money and running any small business is tough. Why on earth shouldn't a vet, or any other proffessional, make a (comparatively) good wage?
  • chucksawaychucksaway Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    When people start using these forums to name call, as you did, and then start implying that some should get of their 'asses' - it degenerates into a slanging match and I admit I rose to the bait because I do hate sanctimonious lecturing. I don't wish to challange anything you stated in defence of your veterinary friends and practice as the whole point of these forums is to exchange helpful information and yes sometimes air views, which we are all entitled to do. The whole thing loses its value if people just use it to mud sling and bicker. I think we have established that vets vary, but I think you could have put things a little better had you advised those who started the thread with complaints, how they could have gone about addressing their gripes rather than just 'having a go' at them. After all, seeing as you are in a position to do so this given your job, how much better would that have been? More polite and more appropriate AND altogether more useful. The 'health and welfare' part of this forum might well benefit far more from some useful comments from you I think, assuming that your practice sees poultry cases?
  • chucksawaychucksaway Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    I just note that you have posted on the health and welfare site and am pleased - lots of folks rely on help from this forum it's clear. The more qualified and experienced information available to share, the better - for reasons which we have just thrashed out I think!
  • from field to forkfrom field to fork Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    chucksaway wrote:
    And by the way Linz2882, I am not in the least small-minded, am entitled to my opinion based on my experience and also I actually do work my 'ass' off also but when I provide a service to the public I don't rip them off or be rude to them no matter how many years I've spent qualifying, how long my hours are and how poor or wealthy I may or may not be! I am sure your veterinary friends are tops and bully for you - other people on here have not been so fortunate but that does not mean they are wrong and I don't believe the threads were generally tarring ALL vets with the same brush either! Grow up dear.

    Perfectly said Chucksaway.

    What is more it seems pretty obvious to me that when Tarka in the original post talked about "vets charging too much" Tarka was in no way referring to all vets but just those in Tarka's experience. To then be called small minded could be construed as being unecessarily small minded.
  • blondeblonde Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    well vets have a spot in all of agriculture/animal keeping so i think it is high time we changed the subject. if you dont like the first vet you see get a second opinion on price and subject. If you hit on a good one stick to him or her like glue......enough of this type of chatter and lets get on with the subject of chooks.
  • blondeblonde Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    may be a little help with peoples chook problems on this site would be a good idea. We all are not vets ...... we all do not know quite what to do .......we all just work on our own experiences. We all would appreciate some expertise on this site I am sure.....I am sure I do not speak alone on this site either.
  • from field to forkfrom field to fork Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    I agree with Blonde that some of the posts in this thread [inclding mine] were getting a little too personal - and this should be discouraged. And I for one apologise to Tarka if any of my comments gave offence.

    But this was one of the more popular threads in this part of the forum, with more contributiers than many and several thousand views. I do not think that it should be "closed down" per se.

    It is pretty obvious that if one does not like one vet one looks for another - if you are given the choice in your locality.

    I think it was fascinating to see the views of a member who works for a vet counter poised with other members experiences.

    Long live free speech!
  • blondeblonde Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    I think it is also interesting but we are not getting anywhere with line of thought. It is time we changed the subject and go on with chatting on the chooks/chickens depending on which country you live in. Yes long live free speech. If it weren't for computers we would not be able to enjoy this free chatter.....So lets find a subject and have a good chat on the site as well.
  • mandiemandie Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    for gods sake guys everyone has experienced good vets and bad lets not all tie them into being the same,surely if you need a vet for any animal you pay what is asked after all we all keep animals of all varietys for our own pleasure if they become ill and need a vet,who have to study for many many years as animals cant say where it hurts,we take them,we decide to keep animals so if a vet is needed dont snipe and complain,if your quibbling about vet costs etc surely you shouldnt keep animals of any kind,we can talk and say where it hurts animals cant so a vets job is extremely hard so please just be grateful we have the fantastic people that are prepared to put in all the years training to look after our pets.
  • NZ BenNZ Ben Junior Member
    edited May 2009
    I appreciate your comments re veterinary expertise and charging for this. You may find some vets are studiously researching Backyard Chickens on the internet looking to improve their knowledge and develop practical economical solutions for their clients! Cheers from one such vet in New Zealand . . .
  • from field to forkfrom field to fork Senior Member
    edited May 2009
    Sounds fantastic Ben - good luck with your work. Can you tell us more?
  • anandikavanandikav Junior Member
    edited August 2009
    hi,
    i strongly agree with you.
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