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(Hayles17) Chicken attacked - broken wing?

Hi girls

I'm posting on behalf of my niece "Hayles17" in New Zealand who recently joined the site but can't post at the moment.   Here's her question.

So something got into the coop last Saturday (thinking a
cat or a possum) and one of the girls ended up flighting through the air gap
(it is going to have chicken wire attached soon but have a temp mesh against
the gap for the time being to stop anymore unwelcome visitors. Anyway Pattie
(German Barnevelder) ended up being bitten and savagely attacked (feathers
ripped out the lot it was awful finding her like that)!

 I bathed her wounds and applied propolis tincture to the
wound (huge gaping hole in her back) and have had her in a dog crate in the
garage since - attached to the house so nice and cosy and away from the
elements.

 Got her out the other day to see how she was walking and
it now seems her wing is broken... is it too late to strap it up being a week
later? It isn’t dragging but it certainly isn’t tucked neatly into her body
like the other, however it is the side with the gaping hole so maybe it’s
uncomfortable!?

 Just looking for some advice on if I should strap or if
it is too late & anything else I could do to help her?

 Thanks

Comments

  • undautriundautri Senior Member
    hi
    sorry to hear about the attack 
    its a bit late to strap the wing  if its broken but sounds possibly like its more painful because of the wound .
    ive had a couple of chooks attacked in the past by foxes and a dog and they seem to take a few weeks to get over the shock and werestiff for a while
    youre doing evberything right keeping her warm and secure - just watch out for infection and flies
    xx kath
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