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Poorly Houdini

Henzilla Member
edited March 2013 in Poultry Health and Welfare
Hi everyone, I'm sure this has been asked so many times with poorly chooks.
(hou)dini was fine when I let her out with the others this morning, your standard wheres the breakfast at.
But got home this evening after searching for half an hour thinking she'd been nabbed by the local foxes to find her tail down on the floor in the hen hut.
Had a gentle check & a little yolk came out, she felt 'puffy' if that gives a bit of a guide, she's obviously not well. They were powder wormed beginning of Feb so don't think that could have done it (?)
Gave her a small dose of baytrill that I had & put her back to bed.
Recomendations welcome please.
Thank you

Comments

  • undautri Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    hi
    the baytril is a wise move to work on any possible infection
    you may want to try a bath for her tomorrow- just enough water to cover her vent when shes lying down.leave her for about 15 mins if shes happy there are excetions of course but most hens will relax and hopefully push out any bits of shell which could be there if an egg has broken inside .
    if its a soft shell thats caustng the problem then funnily enough they are harder to lay than a normal egg because the muscles just squash it instead of pushing it.Thats why hens can wear themselves out and feel poorly if laying soft shells.
    adding some calcium to her diet for a day or two could help- it helps the contractions
    hope shes better soon
    xxkath
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Do you happen to know when she laid her last egg? If it's within the last few days then it could "just" be a stuck broken egg. If it's weeks then it's probably peritonitis.

    In either case - get her into a warm water bath (up to her abdomen) straight away and let her soak for a good 15 minutes. Gently feel inside to see if there is a broken shell that can be very carefully pulled out whilst in the bath.

    Then gently blow dry her and keep her in overnight - in a nice warm box with clean bedding.

    Continue to give her baytril at the rate of 1ml per kilo of bodyweight per day, ideally split into two doses, eg. a 2 kg hen would get 1ml twice a day. Do this for at least 7 days (but no more than 10).


    Don't worry if you can't get anything out of her in the bath. Just syringe a little oil into her vent before you put her to bed and this may help.
    The longest time I have known a broken shell take to come out is 16 days! All neatly wrapped inside a soft brown lump. The upset to the system will hopefully stop your hen producing more eggs in the meantime.

    Please let us know how you get on.

    Hx
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    She's a young girl with 2 others the same age (plus one old lady)
    Only had 2 brown eggs today as the old girl lays rarely & hers are white.
    I did smear a bit of vaseline around the area while having a check, couldn't feel anything but didn't want to distress her anymore.
    They have calcium mixed in with grit.
    I'll see what she's like in the morning but will have to wait till I get home from work, shame they don't do a 'take a chook to work day'.
    I'll give her what Baytril I have left in the morn.
    Need to get some more meds.
    Thanks again for the advice. ;)
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Maybe you could take your chook to work anyway and start a trend;)
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    Did take my budgie to work once!
    Just coz the vets are in town & I work on the other side so have to pass through town to go home, pain in the bott.
    That would be fun wouldn't it......
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Are you sure she passed a little yolk? If so that does sound like a soft, shelless egg. These cause them a lot of discomfort but once passed, the hen acts as if she never had a problem. The baytril wont do any harm but you should complete the course of treatment. Bit of a worry that you said she is swollen, hopefully it isn't EYP. Hopefully she will bounce back tomorrow.
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    It was a yolk in consistancy, like I said I didn't want to poke about too much.
    I suppose swollen was a bit over kill, not the hard mass my old girl got.
    A little squidgy really, not hard.
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    Hi peeps, picked up some meds from the vet but for some reason he couldn't give me baytril something to do with a licence (?)
    So instead he gave me some Noroclav for dogs, in tablets :eek:
    I'm sure I can sort some way of breaking them but would it help to wash them down?
    All I've got some honey? with a little warm water?
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Noroclav is Amoxycillin and Clavulanic acid (no idea about the second one, but Amoxy is regularly used in humans). Never heard of that being used in hens before. I'm guessing they are general, all purpose antiBs. How is she doing today? Do you have to give half a pill/quarter? Pop her on your lap, wrapped in a towel if doing it on your own. Hold her head with left hand and slip a finger gently into her beak to keep it open then pop the pill in, it should just go down. If she managed to shake her head she might throw it back out again. Good luck.
  • doormouse Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Meds seem to work for mine if I stuff it in a grape or a bit of catfood. My Tikka was similar Monday - a miserable heap of feathers with soft shell hanging out of her vent...I hope I got it all out and syringed olive oil into her vent and made her a calcium tablet and margerine omelette - too cold for a bath as she does stress and would hate a blow dry and being kept in! I have been giving her colloidal silver every day since - she seems much more like her old self, though I'm not completely happy with her - lost count of eggs today so will count properly tomorrow, keep an eye out and she'll have a vet trip for proper meds if need be. Hope Hou perks up for you soon!:) M
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Hens are certainly easier to give tablets to than cats;) :eek:
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    She was out & about like nothing had happened, oddly she was taking a few high funny steps, a 'funny walk' to be exact as in the Cleese variety! had 3 brown eggs today....
    Decided to crush it with a little honey & wam water, she got a bit wise to it already & tried to hide by pushing her lookee likeys to me, crafty moo.
    They vet said one pill am & one pm, no half measure, little concerned about the amount.
    They all usually have a treat now & again of scrambled egg, would it matter if the others ate it? Seems a waste to throw the eggs over the hedge.

    (I was on amoxycillin for a chest infection too!)
  • undautri Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    lol they soon get wise to our plans!
    i cant see that it would hurt at all to use her eggs for the others- any passed on into their eggs would be insignificant and not a danger to humans anyway
    xxkath
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Agreed Kath, but as long as you are using them yourself and not selling them... you never know if someone has a serious allergy to antiBs and might react.... remote possibility but still a real one I guess. The John Cleese funny walk seems to be well known on here. My Sophie has been doing it for a while with some style. Almost as if she had studied the YouTube video of 'how to do the Ministry of Funny Walks'! Good news that she is looking good again. I found a white, soft egg sack of albumen on the step this evening (how they all missed it I don't know). I think it was Isabelle who passed it as she was looking 'off' this afternoon!
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Glad Houdini is a little better.

    Just an observation about the funny walk: This has happened to a couple of my hens when they have had an egg mass in the oviduct. You may have seen my recent thread re "Alice" - she walked like this a lot last year.
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    My old chook Ginge did as well before she had to go on her final journey, I really hope not for dini as she's just 2.....ish :(
    I wonder if it's their way of getting things 'move' downstairs a bit?
    I don't sell my eggs & oddly, rarely eat them myself.
    She tried harder to hide tonight, sat behind my old light sussex in the nest box thinking I couldn't see her in the dark!
    Think I managed to get more med's on me than down her neck tonight. It's getting more of a fight & I hate it I think I'm gong to hurt her.
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    I hadn't made the correlation between the walk and the final steps.... I am hoping that is a coincidence.....

    Have you tried putting the pill into a piece of bread and squeezing it small so that she eats the whole thing at once? You will need to get her on her own though because someone else will grab it quick if you don't!
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    I'm crossing my fingers there's no coincidence either!
    The tablet is a bit big I thing for her to try in one go & she's smart, she might be able to 'smell' something.
    Might toy with that idea as yet, sounds like a cunning plan!

    She felt quite light tonight after our battle, rather more concerned now, what would be best to feed her to gain weight?
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Are you sure she is eating her regular food and not 'pretend' eating?
  • 275wright Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    I hope Houdini is feeling better. I find with tablets if you break it in half, put it inside something like a piece of grape open their beak and just pop it into the back of their throat. i know what you mean about the 'funny walk'. My two rescued girls that I got in September did this for weeks. They were very bald and once they got their feathers they didn't do it again. love Sharon xxxx
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    Tried hiding it & she's too cunning, didn't eat it!
    Trouble is due to work I've been too late home in the evening so had to cut back to 1 tablet instead of the 2 she's supposed to have. :(
    She's eating as normal, hand fed her some corn & mealworns which she munched down asap.
    Hate it soooo much, must be so miserable for her knowing I'm going to 'get her' first thing in the morning.
  • doormouse Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Sometimes I try my meds in an omelette - take sick chook to an isolated place and pretend it's a treat - especially when the others can see but not munch!:) M
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    Now then boys & girls, there was a pile of feathers in the hut this morning, is she actually feeling under the weather because she's moulting?
    This morning I tried the other way of just putting 2 halfs of a tablet down her neck & worked better than putting it in liquid form.
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    Moulting does definitely make hens lose confidence and seem a little depressed, but it does seem a strange time to be moulting. Has she already moulted during the winter?
  • undautri Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    hi
    glad to hear shes on the mend :D
    some breeds moult twice a year and theres also a theory that moulting habits depend on the time of year that a chick is born , most chicks hatch spring and summer and moult late autumn or winter but if born in autumn or winter then it would then mean they moult spring instead
    moults also can occur after broodiness, stress or after an illness
    my georgie moults several times a year as shes always going broody!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! my angel moulted heavily in summer after a fox attack.
    so if yours has been ill or stressed out then she could easily be having a mini moult - - poultry spice will give her a boost
    xxkath
  • Henzilla Member
    edited March 2013
    My heart was in my mouth last night might have discovered the cause....
    Half 5 ish my old hen had gone in for the night so was watching the other 3 out the window, they couldn't see me so I wondered why they all trotted back out & headed towards the garden (stock) fence, watched for a few minutes as they were acting 'alert' then I saw IT, red in colour with a bushy tail intently watching my girls :eek:
    I never moved so fast in my life just glad I had clothes on!
    Totally paranoid now!
    Might have been the cause, I've no idea or could be another chook moulting.
    She seems a bit better anyway as we had a fight to get the tablet down & she pooped on me! :rolleyes:
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    :eek: Hope your fence is nice and strong!

    Kath - thanks for the interesting info. I always make a note of when my hens moult and there seems to be no pattern at all :D Didn't know they could moult twice either.
  • undautri Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    that would definately cause enough stress to bring on a mini moult . you can bet thats not the first visit by mr fox and certainly not the last ...they can lie in wait just watching for days before working out their plan of attack
    i really hope you can fence him out.
    sounds like houdini is getting stronger each day with you - so pleased :)

    helen - im a veritable mine of useless information:p
    heres some more - cockerels also suffer in the moult - all the protein in their diet goes into feather production so they are temporarily infertile ....a major or too long moult can make them permanently infertile
    useless info for you as i say but one day you may take the plunge and get a boyfriend for your girls:D
    xkath
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited March 2013
    I doubt it with my penchant for "special needs" hens:D
    I have to confess also I am one of those people who just love their early morning sleep far too much:o

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