Clover in the lawn.....

Littlechick Senior Member
edited August 2012 in Poultry Health and Welfare
I have been fighting my OH this summer about the clover/weeds in the back lawn. He used to religiously apply weed and feed throughout the growing seasons, but since the arrival of the hennies I have vetoed chemicals in the garden. He grumbled so much about the weeds in the lawn that I went out and dug most of them out by hand..... he hasn't noticed.... :rolleyes: He cut the lawn yesterday.... well it was shaved really badly.. I told him that he was just allowing the weeds a play day without the longer grass around them... the irony is that he used to get cross with me if I cut the lawn too short....

I am now thinking about fencing off part of the top lawn and applying some spray weedkiller just to the worst areas. It would have to stay fenced off for quite some time I guess. Trouble is the chicks could fly in there, though I don't think so. I would have to do it on a very still day. I don't want to... but now I don't think I have much choice. If I am going to do use the evil stuff, I am going to have to do it whilstl there is still some growing weather so that it can grow out fast and I can throw out the contaminated grass cuttings.

Anyone suggest a spray weedkiller for clover that isn't lethal....... please? :(

Comments

  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    I usually find that when winter comes the chickens manage to scratch all the clover out:)

    There is a chemical that horse owners use on grazing areas, called grazon. Usually the horses have to be kept off the grass for a week. HOWEVER - I've no idea if it's safe for chickens, and personally wouldn't use weedkiller anywhere near them.

    Most weedkillers remain active for at least six weeks and for this reason cannot be composted either.
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Yes, I know Solar, it will be with very heavy heart that I do the deed on the grass. I think I will fence it off for a week just to see if they can get in before I spray anything, then I will use a spot spray. I will look up the horse one, thanks for the hint.
  • monkeymummy Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    I think I must be a freak as I love having clover in the lawn! I think it looks so pretty and it means we get loads of different varieties of bees in the garden too. Is it really a bad thing to have? (PS As you may guess I know b all about gardening lol)
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    If it was up to me Sarah, I wouldn't care. I hate chemicals so the thought of doing this goes against what I believe. Thinking of waiting till next spring.....
  • MEGAN Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Sarah I'm odd too I like having moss in my lawn as it makes a nice bed for the dog to play fetch on without it being ploughed up and ending up muddy. Dad goes mad and says it should go and he will spray it but I stop him I need that area for the dog in winter
    Good job I'm not too fussy as with the rubbish weather and lawn mower problems its all a bit of a disaster this year its far too long and getting on my nerves
  • monkeymummy Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Know what you mean Littlechick!

    Megan, we did have moss, but the chickens have kindly removed it all for us!
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Yes Jules - wait until spring - I bet they will eat it all by then, just like mine and Sarah's do. :)
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    OK, latest plan is this... I am going to use some scissors on the clover patches to weaken it lol. Think of me girls, on my hands and knees with a pair of scissors cutting clover. The hennies will be watching me from the other side of the fence thinking that I have found something yummy..... I will throw some over the fence to see if they will eat it...

    They will have access to the top lawn during the winter (when their own grass gets too mangled) so hopefully they might take a shine to the taste of clover...... One day we will have some land and then my OH can have his perfect lawn and I will have my wild flower meadows... only problem is that I like to have the hennies outside the back door where I can see them so his lawn will have to be somewhere else........ :D Maybe if he has an acre or two to mow he won't have time for lawn fertiliser/weedkillers etc......
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Correct me if I'm wrong ladies of the forum - but won't cutting it only make it stronger:eek:

    I can assure you they should eat it, especially when the grass starts to weaken in the autumn. Clover tastes sweeter than grass so they will enjoy it ;)
  • doormouse Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    OHs might freak at this idea but what I would do is dig the clover out where it is in clumps with a spade so you have something resembling clover turf...then replant it. We did this from our front lawn to tidy it up a bit when we moved and I replanted it in patches around the run (as far as they can stretch their necks out:D ) and in my newly created wild patch...as I said, just an idea!:eek: M
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Hmmm interesting idea Marie but I shudder to think at OHs response to holes dug in the lawn.

    But... I decided on a new strategy yesterday after spending ten minutes cutting the clover with scissors..... I brought the girls up onto a new fenced off section of the top lawn to see what they would do... ah I LOVE the girls... they started to eat the clover!! Wonder if that is why there wasn't any clover in the top lawn at the beginning of the year but it seemed to take a hold once the hens were taken off it?

    Problem possibly solved then!
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    We did try to tell you:p Bet your chickens have been laughing about it the whole time:D
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    Yes, I know.... but the girls are banned from the top lawn for the summer...... something about the rest of the family objecting to the poos on the patio lol.
  • solarbatssolarbats Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    So that's why my family never visit any more:D
  • monkeymummy Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    That's a good plan, maybe I'll just leave the poop on the patio and mil won't come round anymore!:D
  • Littlechick Senior Member
    edited August 2012
    You girls are so funny.
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