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Poultry Processing Problems.

premier688000 Junior Member
edited March 2013 in Producers and Vets
As a highly experienced consultant to poultry processing companies and with over 30 years poultry processing experience, I would welcome any questions via this message board. Do you have any specific issues in your processing facility? Perhaps poor yield, poor quality or simply too high costs of production. May be you need more throughput but aren't sure of the best way to move forward.

I'm a specialist in automated production from say 3000 Bph through to 12,000 Bph, however I do have plenty of experience of lower throughput's currently relevant to developing countries and which were common here in the UK some 30 years ago.

My expertise covers the following areas;

Live bird handling, transportation and factory reception.
Kill line including electric/gas stunning, kill, bleed, scald & de-feathering.
Evisceration.
Air or water chill.
Whole bird grading and packing room distribution, bagging/wrapping and boxing.
Cut up & filleting.
Whole bird and portion freezing.
Waste recovery andprocessing.

Post me your questions and I will try my best to offer you some meaningful help and advice. Any subject welcome. If you need to keep your questions confidential send me an e-mail or private message. or you can read more at www.poultryprocessingequipment.co.uk

Comments

  • premier688000 Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    Thank you for your question!

    You could well be correct in that the difference is simply how dry the birds are when taking the input weight.

    Ultimately there is really only one thing that is lost in terms of yield in an air chiller. That is moisture.

    The whole reason for using an air chill process for fresh production is to remove as much surface moisture as possible. This is to give maximum shelf life.

    However notice the use of the word "surface"

    The last thing you want to do is remove moisture from meat or the sub-surface of the skin.

    In reality its not very common to be removing moisture from the meat as this would need to be exposed by the way of cuts etc, but that is certainly worth a quick look. It could be in the form of skin tears or open flesh due to PMI cuts etc. However the weight loss your talking about wouldn't really fit with those.

    The only other area for moisture loss is through skin that has been damaged by having its epidermal layer removed in plucking. This is often referred to as marking or bruising. The tell tale signs can be seen after chill, and are the areas of skin that appear dark brown like old brown paper.

    Although this "marking" is caused by the pluckers it can be the result of issues with the scald tank, bleed, killer or stunning or in fact general bird stress or quality. Lets not get into that as that's a whole topic that I could right a book on!

    The simple fact is that the amount of "controllable" moisture loss in air chilling is directly proportional to the percentage of epidermal removal.

    In other words, if you have a perfectly plucked, soft scald bird with no excess moisture when entering the chiller you might expect say 1% yield (moisture) loss. If you have a hard scald bird with all its epidermal layer removed you might get say 2.5% loss. If you get a bird with 50% of its epidermal removed then your loss would be bang on 1.75%. Does that make sense? So its easy to loose 0.3-0.5% because of "marking"

    I've spend tens if not hundreds of days over the years working on this problem and trust me, that is the only controllable factor (unless you can except wetter post chill product)

    So those are the two areas I'd be looking at if I were you. But remember, it only really makes any difference if your end product is "skin on"!. If all you whole birds are portioned, with breast meat being skinless fillets then any benefit you gain in the chiller will be reduced by the loss of skin further down the process.

    I did do a lot of work several years ago for Buxted chicken at Flixton (now 2 Sisters) using electro-static technology to apply water at several stages in the air chiller. The reason for using electro-statics is that it makes the chicken behave like a magnet, attracting the moisture, so very fine water sprays could be used. I ultimately proved all the theory but the cost of implementation out stripped the benefit for them as almost all there output back then was skinless.

    Hope this long ramble gives you some useful pointers. Feel free to come back I can help further.

    Cheers

    Richard Hawley.
    www.poultryprocessingequipment.co.uk
    www.poultryprocessingequipment.com
  • premier688000 Junior Member
    edited March 2011
    I would look to do some controlled testing. Prior to a break, drop the temperature of the scald tank a degree or so to remove all the scalding/marking. Take a batch of say 20 birds post EV, weigh them immediately pre chill then post chill. MAKE SURE that you remove any un-plucked feathers as the softer scalding may well leave feather on carcasses. A wet feather weights lots!

    Do the same with a normal batch of birds and see what the result is.


    Don’t forget to put the scald tank temperature back to normal. You can get a quick lowering of the scald tank by adding some cold water but make sure that tank temperature had time to even out/stabilise.

    You might want to do the test several times on different bird weights.
    www.poultryprocessingequipment.co.uk
  • Sadia Seemeen Junior Member
    edited May 2012
    Hi there

    I work in a poultry processing plant and we want to trial a new set of plucking fingers.

    However, I noticed that it is very hard to quantify the change. We are planning to change pluckers in the main plucking tank where 95% of the feathers are removed.

    Can someone suggest how to monitor a trial- where we can quantify the difference between the current pluckers and the new ones?

    Thanks
  • Sadia Seemeen Junior Member
    edited July 2012
    premier688000 said:
    As a highly experienced consultant to poultry processing companies and with over 30 years poultry processing experience, I would welcome any questions via this message board. Do you have any specific issues in your processing facility? Perhaps poor yield, poor quality or simply too high costs of production. May be you need more throughput but aren't sure of the best way to move forward.

    I'm a specialist in automated production from say 3000 Bph through to 12,000 Bph, however I do have plenty of experience of lower throughput's currently relevant to developing countries and which were common here in the UK some 30 years ago.

    My expertise covers the following areas;

    Live bird handling, transportation and factory reception.
    Kill line including electric/gas stunning, kill, bleed, scald & de-feathering.
    Evisceration.
    Air or water chill.
    Whole bird grading and packing room distribution, bagging/wrapping and boxing.
    Cut up & filleting.
    Whole bird and portion freezing.
    Waste recovery andprocessing.

    Post me your questions and I will try my best to offer you some meaningful help and advice. Any subject welcome. If you need to keep your questions confidential send me an e-mail or private message. or you can read more at www.poultryprocessingequipment.co.uk

    Hi Premier 688000

    We are facing some issues with blood spotting in the breast meat of the birds while deboning. What could be the potential cause of this? Is it the stunner settings? The birds usually go through ACP after kill and are aged for atleast 4 hours prior to deboning.

    What are your thoughts on the reasons for blood-spotting? Look forward to your reply soon.

    Thanks and regards
    Sadia
  • muhammadfarms1 Junior Member
    edited March 2013
    there are alot of problems in poultry so we need much more care for productivity

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