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Pink Feet

Mumma Bear Junior Member
edited October 2010 in Poultry Health and Welfare
I noticed today that my chickens feet look slightly pink. Usually they're much paler... Any ideas? They have woodshavings on the floor of their coop which is changed regularly.

Comments

  • undautriundautri Senior Member
    edited October 2010
    hi
    it could just be the weather (are you in this country?)
    what sort of wood chippings? have you changed the brand lately?
    kath
  • brent21holmes Junior Member
    edited October 2010
    It could also be the wood chippings that caused it to be pink.
    If the chippings are not to fine it might hurt the chicks feet.
    That causes it be be light red.
    Try to change it with finer chippings and change it regularly.
  • Mumma Bear Junior Member
    edited October 2010
    Using the brand of shavings I've used for past couple of years, but will try finer ones (isn't dust from finer ones a problem?). I'm on the east coast of Scotland, weather's pretty mild at the moment but damp. Checked their feet tis morning and can't see anything unusual going on.... maybe I'm imagining things!
  • undautriundautri Senior Member
    edited October 2010
    As long as its pink feet, not pink elephants:D
    one of mine had sore feet the other day and sandie recommended dipping in iodine in warm water.- just a thought!
    kath
  • Henkeeper Member
    edited October 2010
    If winter is approaching in your country(I'm in wales, its always cold, wet and windy, generally bleak) the blood flow in a chickens feet will increase by 40% of its usual. due to this increase in blood flow, the chickens inbuilt heat transfer of blood heat (that prevents large quantities of body heat to be lost through their feet), this increase of blood flow will often cause your chickens feet to go red/pink.
  • Mumma Bear Junior Member
    edited October 2010
    I've decided that my girls are moulting. They've never really gone through a proper one before - a couple of feathers here and there - but they're looking decidedly scruffy just now. Would that affect their laying? I spent the day watching them and they wandered about the garden in a huddle, pecking here and there, coming over to see what i was up to but looking a bit embarrassed with their appearance. I keep checking the garden for rogue nests but nothing, and they haven't been over the fence for days so they're not laying there.... How long should I expect this moult to last before they start laying again? I miss my eggs!
  • spodski Senior Member
    edited October 2010
    Hi,
    Yes they don't usually lay while moulting. It takes a lot out of them to grow new feathers so they have a rest from laying. Time taken to moult varies. My book says that you can speed up the process by feeding them hard grain only for 3 days.
    Regards,
    Lynn
  • BaltiAngel Senior Member
    edited October 2010
    Mine are still miserable and moulting after three weeks, we haven't had any eggs for about six to eight weeks ago...and they don't look like they are going to lay any time soon. Usually they will have a rest over winter except if they are one of the breeds bred to lay almost continuosly , or they are ex-batts...I just "go off" eggs for the duration:D and we tell our customers to wait and see;) The chicks of last year started laying in December, even though it was very cold and dark, and I'm hoping that they will do the same this year with the addition of our chick from this year! Im giving mine all sorts of things to keep their peckers up as they look so forlorn and sorry for them selves:o
    Good luck with yours!
    L:)
  • iloveexbats Senior Member
    edited October 2010
    Hi there - yes I think my ex-batts feet look a little pink in colder weather. Are your girls feet just pink or do they look sore as well? Moulting does take it out of them but with good care they will recover and start to lay again. Isn't it awful how when you are used to your own free range eggs, nothing in the shops taste anything like the real thing, even though they claim to be free range? I know that some people give their girls soaked dried cat food during a moult because it contains extra protein. I know that it sounds crazy but I have been giving my Dora scrambled eggs every now and then to help her through her moult. I hope they recover soon.:)
  • Mumma Bear Junior Member
    edited October 2010
    Thanks for all the sound advice. It's true that shop eggs, even 'free range' ones don't taste or look the same so I'll just wait patiently. I'd heard about dried cat food and tried them with some this morning as a treat. They were a bit wary (the ducks loved it!). I'll try crushing it down a bit and soak it, see if that helps. I'll also increase their grain for a few days - basically, I'll try anything, I hate seeing them so miserable. Having said that, they got quite interested in a patch of garden I cleared this afternoon and Ethel even made a couple of announcements! Their feathers are coming in nicely, so maybe I won't have to wait too long!
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